Creamy Buckwheat “Risotto” Style

Check out this awesome looking recipe from The Healthy Foodie
This recipe uses buckwheat groats, chicken breast, teff, broccoli and Parmesan cheese.

Breakfast of Buckwheat and Milk

buckwheat and milk Photo by Natalia Lisovskaya
Photo by Natalia Lisovskaya

For recipes using buckwheat click here

Buckwheat Ice Cream Recipe

I didn’t know there was such a thing as buckwheat ice cream until today. I wonder what it taste like! Unfortunately it is only available in Japan. But you can try making it from scratch, i’ve included the link to the recipe below.

Japanese Tea Flavoured Ice Cream
From Japan – The one in the middle is the buckwheat flavored ice cream. The green one is green tea flavor. (Photo by Timothy Takemoto on flickr)

Soba-cha (Buckwheat Tea) Soft Ice Cream Cone from Shibuya Tokyo Department Store Food Show
(Photo by yusheng on flickr)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s another one from Japan. According to the blogger, Felicia who posted this, you can get this at one of 27 road stations in Aomori.  Go to “Road Station Shichinohe” located in Shichinohe Town where Shinkansen (bullet train) stops at Shichinohe-Towada Station (you can walk to the road station).


Buckwheat Soft Serve Ice Cream (Aomori, Japan)

Why not try making it yourself! Here’s a recipe using buckwheat kernels and buckwheat honey
(A recipe from the L.A. Times)


Buckwheat ice cream cubes (Glenn Koenig / Los Angeles Times)

And another recipe from the website Love & Lentil

If you have your own recipe, do share!

Breakfast Around The World

See what people eat for breakfast around the world from countries like Japan and Canada.
Images complied by sonicbomb on imgur.com

How accurate is it? What do you normally eat for breakfast?

Food Portions & ‘Healthy’ Labels. How Does it Influence Us?

Portion Size Experiment

Looking at this image, would you eat more of the low fat coleslaw because it says LOW FAT?

This is what a study by researchers at the University of Ulster published earlier this month in the International Journal of Obesity aim to find out.  Would people eat larger portions of the ‘healthier’ food when given a choice even if both choices contain the same amount of calories.

“Foods are marketed as being healthier for a reason, because food producers believe, and they correctly believe, that those labels will influence us to eat their products and perhaps eat more of their products,” said Dr. Cliodhna Foley Nolan the director of Human Health and Nutrition at Safefood, a government agency in Ireland.

In the study, 186 participants were asked to serve themselves coleslaw, with one labelled ‘healthier’ and the other ‘standard’. However in reality both choices had almost the same amount of calories. (224 calories per 100g  for the one labelled ‘healthier’ and 223 calories for the ‘standard’.)

The result of the study was that the participants served themselves more of the ‘healthier’ coleslaw compared with the ‘standard’ as they had underestimated the amount of calories.

The conclusion of the study was that nutrition claims could be promoting inappropriate portion size selection and consumption behavior.

The bottom line is that it is always good to read the nutrition labels. Having tons of health claims pasted on the packaging does not mean we can eat more to feel less guilty since we assume its healthier.

Source:  International Journal of Obesity (7 May 2013) | doi:10.1038/ijo.2013.69 – Perceived ‘healthiness’ of foods can influence consumers’ estimations of energy density and appropriate portion size

Image source