10 Reasons to Include Buckwheat In Your Diet Plans

bowl of buckwheat seeds

The name buckwheat is misleading because it isn’t related to wheat at all. In fact, buckwheat isn’t a true grain, but rather the fruit of a leafy plant belonging to the same family as sorrel and rhubarb. It is often referred to as a pseudo-cereal, since the grain is used in ways similar to cereal grains. Its name comes from a Dutch word that translates as “beechwheat,” most likely a reference to the plant’s triangular fruits, which resemble beechnuts. Most of us are most familiar with buckwheat flour used to make the pancakes, crepes or noodles (Japanese Soba). Here are 10 reasons why you should give buckwheat a try:

  1. Buckwheat is high in fiber; good for those with constipation.
  2. The protein in buckwheat has all 9 essential amino acids (that the body cannot manufacture), making it closer to being a “complete” protein.
  3. Buckwheat is high in the amino acid lysine, which is used for tissue growth and repair.
  4. Buckwheat is gluten-free so this makes it suitable for those with wheat allergies.
  5. Buckwheat is rich in calcium, iron, vitamin E, and B vitamins, magnesium, manganese, zinc and copper.
  6. The magnesium in buckwheat, helps relaxes blood vessels; helps improve circulation, decrease blood pressure and reduce cholesterol.
  7. Buckwheat helps to stabilize blood sugar levels. Due to the slower breakdown and absorption of the carbohydrates in buckwheat, this helps to raise our blood sugar levels more evenly. This especially good for those suffering with diabetes by helping to control their blood sugar levels.
  8. Buckwheat is low in calories, good in helping to reduce fat accumulation.
  9. Buckwheat contains rutin, a chemical that strengthens capillary walls.
  10. Buckwheat being high in insoluble fiber, can help women avoid gallstones. It is also protective against childhood asthma.



Super Buckwheat Brownies

I manipulated Cutterlight’s brownie recipe to be GF with buckwheat flour and coconut sugar. Yes- it is still sugar and sweet and maybe a notch less on the glycemic index. Works for me.

I used Valrhona cocoa powder and their 70% Andoa Noire feves and Guittard’s organic 74% wafers. Both lightly chopped. I buy my chocolate by the kilo from Chocosphere. The base is buckwheat flour, almond flour and butter, eggs and oil (I did coconut, avocado and sunflower). You’ll likely want to fold in the nibs and goji berries so they don’t burn. You can mix everything but nuts, chocolate and berries, up together in one bowl, then fold those in.


via Super buckwheat brownies — Wendy’s Place

Buckwheat Crepes with Caramelized Apples

This is a buckwheat crepe recipe served with caramelized apples. Crepes are so simple to prepare and pretty simple to make. It is easy to mix the batter in a blender so you don’t get any clumps from the flour. And remember, the first few crepes never turn out good. But keep trying. […]

via Buckwheat Crepes and Caramelized Apples — Panza Baby

Chocolate Buckwheat Crêpes with Cappuccino Ganache

Today I have decided to share Sarah’s recipe for chocolate buckwheat crêpes with cappuccino ganache. My family are mad about pancakes and we often enjoy them as a weekend breakfast treat. Sarah’s version are made with buckwheat flour, sweetened with a touch of honey and served with lashings of chocolate ganache and fresh fruit, delish! […]

via Chocolate buckwheat crêpes and a chat with Sarah Graham — Cupcakes and Couscous

Buckwheat with Crispy Bacon, Carrot & Celery

Buckwheat is plant with a grain-like seed used in many recipes today. It originates from Central Asia, but today you can probably find it in any store or market. Don’t know if many of you had a chance to cook with buckwheat, but a considerable amount of recipes you can find today use buckwheat as a base for the dough so you can make pasta with it, cakes and desserts. Another way to prepare buckwheat is to cook it with vegetables and make a delicious side or main dish.

A few of the interesting facts about buckwheat are:

  • 90% of globally consumed buckwheat originates from Russia,
  • Discarded hulls of buckwheat are used as fillers for the pillows,
  • Buckwheat is also used to manufacture an intensely flavored, dark-colored honey,
  • It is also used in the alcohol beverage industry for the production of gluten-free beer and whiskey,
  • Buckwheat is a rich source of dietary fibers, proteins, vitamins of the B group and minerals such as iron, manganese, copper, magnesium and phosphorus.

Click to view recipe […]

via Buckwheat with crispy bacon, carrot & celery — Recipes by chefkreso

Buckwheat Crepes with Bourbon Vanilla Plums

Good morning! I’ve got the recipe for these Buckwheat Crepes with Bourbon Vanilla Plums for you today. Continue reading for the recipe and a special deal… Does anyone else have a love hate relationship with crepes? I love them. I love how versatile they are and how delicate and simple. But cooking them can be a major pain. I tend to get flustered quickly and give up when I can’t get them to cook without sticking. A few weeks ago I got a set of GreenPan non-stick pans.

via Buckwheat Crepes with Bourbon Vanilla Plums — TENDING the TABLE

Buckwheat Strawberry Buckle with Almond and Cashew Streusel

This is an enriched version of Blue Bottle Coffee’s Strawberry Buckle cake. The original recipe uses all white flour, but I’ve really been enjoying adding buckwheat or rye flour to my bakes. If you’re not sure about buckwheat flour, give it a try. It’s nutritionally one of the better gluten-free ingredients, it has calcium, phophorus […]

via Buckwheat Strawberry Buckle with Almond and Cashew Streusel — Three Hour Brunch Friend

Salted Buckwheat and Tahini Chocolate Chip Cookies

I also had a bag of Iowa buckwheat groats (yay local grains!), a jar of tahini, and a craving for the most delicious, perfectly crispy, perfectly warm, naturally-sweetened chocolate chip cookie. […]

via Salted Buckwheat and Tahini Chocolate Chip Cookies — prairie.notes