10 Reasons to Include Buckwheat In Your Diet Plans

bowl of buckwheat seeds

The name buckwheat is misleading because it isn’t related to wheat at all. In fact, buckwheat isn’t a true grain, but rather the fruit of a leafy plant belonging to the same family as sorrel and rhubarb. It is often referred to as a pseudo-cereal, since the grain is used in ways similar to cereal grains. Its name comes from a Dutch word that translates as “beechwheat,” most likely a reference to the plant’s triangular fruits, which resemble beechnuts. Most of us are most familiar with buckwheat flour used to make the pancakes, crepes or noodles (Japanese Soba). Here are 10 reasons why you should give buckwheat a try:

  1. Buckwheat is high in fiber; good for those with constipation.
  2. The protein in buckwheat has all 9 essential amino acids (that the body cannot manufacture), making it closer to being a “complete” protein.
  3. Buckwheat is high in the amino acid lysine, which is used for tissue growth and repair.
  4. Buckwheat is gluten-free so this makes it suitable for those with wheat allergies.
  5. Buckwheat is rich in calcium, iron, vitamin E, and B vitamins, magnesium, manganese, zinc and copper.
  6. The magnesium in buckwheat, helps relaxes blood vessels; helps improve circulation, decrease blood pressure and reduce cholesterol.
  7. Buckwheat helps to stabilize blood sugar levels. Due to the slower breakdown and absorption of the carbohydrates in buckwheat, this helps to raise our blood sugar levels more evenly. This especially good for those suffering with diabetes by helping to control their blood sugar levels.
  8. Buckwheat is low in calories, good in helping to reduce fat accumulation.
  9. Buckwheat contains rutin, a chemical that strengthens capillary walls.
  10. Buckwheat being high in insoluble fiber, can help women avoid gallstones. It is also protective against childhood asthma.

Sources:
www.buckwheat.com.sg
www.whfoods.com

Buckwheat Banana Cake with Pecans and Maple

Making a cake with buckwheat flour can be a gamble. The results of my experiments in the past have been mixed so I heeded the sage advice of baking guru Alice Medrich and handled the buckwheat flour with extreme care to avoid it toughening from being over processed.

The flavour combination lived up to expectation. The buckwheat flour makes a cake that is dense but not heavy, a great cake to slice and pack into a lunchbox. The nutty banana flavour is not very sweet, just moist and moreish. This cake is  gluten free. […]

via Buckwheat Banana Cake with Pecans and Maple — Please Pass the Recipe

Buckwheat Health Benefits

Buckwheat and Health

  • New evidence shows that buckwheat may be helpful in the management of diabetes. Single doses of buckwheat seed extract lowered blood glucose levels by 12-19 percent. The component responsible for these effects is chiro-inositol.
  • One study found that women who consumed an average of three servings of whole grains daily, such as buckwheat, had a 21 percent lower risk of diabetes compared to those who ate one serving per week.
  • Diets that contain buckwheat have been linked to a lowered risk of developing high cholesterol and high blood pressure.
  • Buckwheat contains a good concentration of dietary fiber and magnesium. Fiber has been shown to reduce cholesterol levels while magnesium helps to promote blood vessel relaxation and blood circulation.
  • People with celiac disease can eat buckwheat. This is an intestinal disease associated with sensitivity to grains or other foods that contain the protein gluten.
  • A concentrated source of phytonutrients called flavonoids that include rutin, quercetin, and kaempferol are found in buckwheat. They are strong antioxidants that protect the cells from harmful free radicals in the body.

[…]

via Health Benefits of Buckwheat —

Buckwheat Pancakes

I had these first at a breakfast place called Suzette and quite liked the idea of these earthy tasting pancaked served with hummus and salad. Now I keep trying them with various flour combinations and toppings. The recipe is simplicity itself. You need A fantastic quality non-stick pan 1/2 cup buckwheat flour ( or a […]

via Buckwheat Pancakes —

Rutin in Buckwheat for Blood Vessel Health

Rutin is found in common foods like apples, figs, and tea.  High amounts of rutin occur naturally in foods especially buckwheat (Fagopyrum genera. F. tataricum), commonly known as tartary buckwheat. Dry tartary buckwheat seeds contain up to 1.7 percent rutin. By comparison, the seeds of common buckwheat, known scientifically as Fagopyrum esculentum, only contain 0.01 percent rutin by dry weight. […] The support of blood vessel health is the most common reason for taking rutin.[…]

via Rutin for Blood Vessel Health — Nutraceutical Asia

Follow my blog with Bloglovin

Chocolate Protein Buckwheat Pancakes

This time I made some chocolate protein buckwheat pancakes by adding raw cacao (for a chocolaty taste) and pea proteins, chia seeds and flax seeds (for proteins). These pancakes are really easy and quick to make, they are healthy, gluten free, not too sweet…

via Chocolate Protein Buckwheat Pancakes — Hearty Vegan Kitchen

Rooibos Tea Smoked Trout with Buckwheat Salad

National Rooibos day was celebrated on the 16th of January, and is the very first year of establishment. Rooibos is part of our diverse Fynbos kingdom and is native to the Cedarberg mountains in the Western Cape of South Africa. It has so many health benefits, from lowering blood pressure to preventing heart disease and strokes. This powerhouse is packed with flavonoids and antioxidants.  […]

via Rooibos Tea smoked Trout with a Buckwheat salad  — Off Beet Blog

Whole Clementine Upside-down Buckwheat Cake

This easy recipe is an easy way to have a good and light fruity desert! MAKES 4 CAKES // 180°C // 15 + 15 min 🍊 Ingredients . 4 clementines . 1 tsp brown sugar, coconut sugar or any sugar . 2 eggs . 2 tsp buckwheat flour . 1 tsp baking powder . […]

via Whole clementine upside-down buckwheat cake🍊 — G A R A N C E